NACH OBEN


[28.05.24]
Boys' Day 2024 workshop on computer-supported collaborative problem solving

Boys' Day 2024 workshop on computer-supported collaborative problem solving

On 25th April 2024, the Educational Psychology and Technology Research Group welcomed 20 boys, 13 to 15 years of age, from various schools of Bochum and the surrounding area to a workshop as part of Boys' Day 2024 (https://www.boys-day.de/).

In the "Group work and computers" workshop, research fellows Arlind Avdullahu and Martin Bordewieck gave the pupils an insight into educational science both as a study subject and as a working field, with a focus on the everyday working life of researchers at the university. The students learnt about the quantitative research process from brainstorming to publication and, thus, got a fairly thorough overview of this career path in educational science.

In the second part of the workshop, the students were introduced to the research field of computer-supported collaborative problem solving. They first learnt what problem-solving means in the context of psychological/educational science and then got to know the variety of settings in which collaborative problem solving can take place with varying degrees of computer support.

Next, an extensive hands-on group activity provided the students with the opportunity to experience collaborative problem solving in a hybrid collaboration setting first hand: They formed groups of four with a unique role assigned to every group member and worked on solving a complex problem through communicating in person while at the same using an online collaboration tool.

This group problem-solving episode confronted the students with several typical problems, but also the clear merits of collaborative processes in hybrid collaboration settings. The workshop, hence, concluded with a plenary discussion reflecting on the many things the students had observed about themselves and their respective groups during collaboration. Finally, the students gave overall feedback on the workshop expressing appreciation and gratitude for a both informative and diverting day off school.

nach oben


[15.05.24]
New publication by Dr. Sebastian Strauß, Dr. Valentina Nachtigall and Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel about Learning Analytics

Dr. Sebastian Strauß, Dr. Valentina Nachtigall and Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel puplished an article with the title "Analyse prozessbezogener Verhaltensdaten mittels Learning Analytics: Aktuelle und zukünftige Bedeutung für die Unterrichtswissenschaft".




Abstract:
For several years, “learning analytics” have been growing as an international research field that focuses on collecting, analyzing and using complex and often multi-model digital trace-data produced by learners and teachers in digital learning settings; employing computational analyses or machine learning tools, these data are used to generate insights into processes of learning and instruction. The scientific community in the area of learning and instruction is currently exploring these developments. However, as researchers have started to recognize the potential of learning analytics, it seems worthwhile to think further about how adopting learning analytics approaches may benefit the field. In this paper, we provide insights into the flourishing area of learning analytics research and provide concrete examples how such approaches can help to expand existing theories on learning and instruction. We focus on self-regulated and collaborative learning on the one hand, and on the other hand on instructional design and teacher support based on learning analytics. We also consider risks and challenges that come with learning analytics (such as missing links between available data and scientific constructs, as well as ethical issues) but also benefits for research on learning and instruction as well as practitioners (such as ways to account for the complexity and temporality of processes during learning and instruction).

Eberle, J., Strauß, S., Nachtigall, V., & Rummel, N. (2024). The potential of learning analytics for research on behavioral learning processes: current and future significance for research on learning and instruction. Unterrichtswissenschaft. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42010-024-00205-5

You can read the article here.

nach oben


[15.05.24]
New publication by Dr. Valentina Nachtigall and Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel about authenticity

Dr. Valentina Nachtigall and Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel puplished a journal paper in the European Journal of Psychology of Education with the title "Model authenticity in learning mathematical experimentation: how students perceive and learn from scientist and peer models". This article is part of a special issue edited by Dr. Valentina Nachtigall.



Abstract:
The implementation of video modeling examples of mathematical hands-on experimentation may provide students with authentic and, at the same time, not too cognitively overwhelming experiences. However, the effectiveness of video modeling examples can be influenced by different characteristics of the observed models. On the one hand, based on the model-observer similarity hypothesis, it is likely that the observation of peers is particularly conducive to learning. On the other hand, from an authentic learning perspective, the presence of experts is considered to constitute a core design element of authentic learning settings which may foster motivational and cognitive learning outcomes. Against the background of these contradictory assumptions, the present study investigates the effects of observing models with different degrees of authenticity on students’ perceived authenticity, their situational interest, and their knowledge acquisition. We conducted an experimental study with 105 10th graders who observed either peer or scientist models performing a mathematical hands-on experiment in a video recording. As expected, the results show that students perceived the scientist models as more authentic than the peer models. Furthermore, we found neither a direct effect of condition nor an indirect effect mediated by students’ perceived authenticity of the observed models on students’ situational interest and knowledge acquisition. With this study, we contribute to the literature on the conditions and effects of authentic learning.

Hagenkötter, R., Nachtigall, V., Rolka, K. & Rummel, N. (2024). Model authenticity in learning mathematical experimentation: how students perceive and learn from scientist and peer models. European Journal of Psychology of Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10212-024-00843-4

You can read the paper here.

nach oben


[13.05.24]
New publication by Markus Weber, Dr. Carina Wiesen & Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel in the area of problem solving

Markus Weber, Dr. Carina Wiesen & Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel published a paper at the Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 24):
I see an IC: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Study Human Problem-Solving Processes in Hardware Reverse Engineering



Abstract:
Trust in digital systems depends on secure hardware, often assured through HRE. This work develops methods for investigating human problem-solving processes in HRE, an underexplored yet critical aspect. Since reverse engineers rely heavily on visual information, eye tracking holds promise for studying their cognitive processes. To gain further insights, we additionally employ verbal thought protocols during and immediately after HRE tasks: Concurrent and Retrospective Think Aloud. We evaluate the combination of eye tracking and Think Aloud with 41 participants in an HRE simulation. Eye tracking accurately identifies fixations on individual circuit elements and highlights critical components. Based on two use cases, we demonstrate that eye tracking and Think Aloud can complement each other to improve data quality. Our methodological insights can inform future studies in HRE, a specific setting of human-computer interaction, and in other problem-solving settings involving misleading or missing information.

Walendy, R., Weber, M., Li, J., Becker, S., Wiesen, C., Elson, M., Kim, Y., Fawaz, K., Rummel, N. & Paar, C. (2024) I see an IC: A Mixed-Methods Approach to Study Human Problem-Solving Processes in Hardware Reverse Engineering. In Proceedings of the CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '24). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.1145/3613904.3642837

nach oben


[02.05.24]
Nikol Rummel published in Applied Cognitive Psychology, is one of our top 10 most-cited papers published

Together with our former Doctoral students Christian Hartmann and with Tamara van Gogh (Utrecht University), Nikol Rummel published in Applied Cognitive Psychology, is one of our top 10 most-cited papers published





Read the full article here:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acp.4004

Hartmann, C., van Gog, T., & Rummel, N. (2022). Productive versus vicarious failure: Do students need to fail themselves in order to learn? Applied Cognitive Psychology, 36(6), 1219–1233. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.4004

nach oben


[22.04.24]
Dr. Valentina Nachtigall has taken up the interim professorship

Dr. Valentina Nachtigall has taken up the interim professorship of educational psychology and technology on March 1, 2024. She has been part of our department since November 2015, when she started her dissertation on the effectiveness of productive failure for learning in an out-of-school lab for social sciences. After obtaining her doctorate in July 2019 (summa cum laude), she moved to a postdoctoral position and has since been interested in empirically and conceptually determining the conditions and effects of authentic learning. Her current DFG project focuses on investigating and measuring students' conceptions of scientists as a condition likely to influence how students perceive and engage in authentic learning activities that attempt to emulate scientific ways of thinking and working. Her academic journey is complemented by prestigious fellowships and numerous research stays abroad. With her rich background, we are confident that she will bring valuable insight and leadership to our academic community. We look forward to the positive impact she will have during her tenure.

nach oben


[22.03.24]
Our team visited GEPF 2024 in Potsdam.

Prof. Nikol Rummel was invited as a discussant in the symposium: Lernprozesse im Kontext der Digitalisierung – Aktuelle Erkenntnisse aus Large-Scale Assessments (Chairs: Leonard Tetzlaff (DIPF, ZIB), Frank Goldhammer (DIPF, ZIB)

Our paper contributions are listed below:
Nachtigall, V., Yek, S., & Rummel, N. (2024). Auswirkungen von Emotionsregulation und Kollaboration auf die Verarbeitung geschichtsbezogener 360°-Videos. Vortrag auf der 11. Tagung der Gesellschaft für Empirische Bildungsforschung (GEBF), 18.03.-20.03.2024, Potsdam, Germany.

Brand, C., Loibl, K., & Rummel, N. (2024). Relevante Vorwissensaktivierung durch fehlerhafte Lösungsbeispiele als Vorbereitung auf das Lernen beim Problemlösen vor Instruktion. Vortrag auf der 11. Tagung der Gesellschaft für Empirische Bildungsforschung (GEBF), 18.03.-20.03.2024, Potsdam, Germany.

nach oben


[22.03.24]
New Journal Publication

Katharina Teich, Vanessa Loock, and Nikol Rummel have recently published a study addressing the challenges of continuing education online courses titled "Meeting the challenges of continuing education online courses: Can we promote self-regulated learning strategies with adaptive support?"

The study explores the difficulties faced by adult learners in managing learning resources such as time, attention, and learning environment in online courses. They developed an adaptive support intervention to address these challenges, finding that it significantly improved environmental structuring but did not affect other self-regulated learning strategies.

Teich, K., Loock, V.S., & Rummel, N. (2024). Meeting the challenges of continuing education online courses: Can we promote self‐regulated learning strategies with adaptive support? British Journal of Educational Technology. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.13453

Read more about it here.

nach oben


[16.02.24]
Self-Regulated Learning in Digitalized Schools: Summit Insights











SeReLiDiS Network Members Nikol Rummel and Sebastian Strauß delve into Hot Topics in Self-Regulated Learning in Digitalized Schools at Research Summit

In February 2024, Prof. Dr. Nikol Rummel and associated researcher Dr. Sebastian Strauß (Ruhr-University Bochum) participated in the Research Summit of the international and interdisciplinary network "Self-Regulated Learning in Digitalized Schools" (SeReLiDiS)" (funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Science, BMBF).

The summit meeting of the members of the SeReLiDiS network, led by Prof. Joachim Wirth (Chair of Teaching and Learning Research, RUB), aimed to examine current topics for educational contexts in which learners engage in self-directed learning with the help of teachers and digital technologies.

On the first day of the summit, participants engaged in academic discussions, tackling various facets of self-regulated learning (SRL) in technologically enhanced contexts. The second day of the summit was dedicated to identifying and evaluating pathways to continuing and expand the network's impact beyond the current funding cycle.

The heart of the research summit was the goal of exploring "hot topics" with the aim of incorporating them into future grant proposals. Nikol Rummel and Sebastian Strauß, with their expertise in computer-supported collaborative learning, contributed to the hot topic titled "Self-regulated learning orchestrated by peers, teachers, and digital tools." For this hot topic, three burning questions were discussed:

The first burning question concerned the "Modeling the Interplay Between Peers, Teachers, and Digital Tools". Besides questions of decision-making behavior and strategic disengagement, one core question was to identify those parts of the regulation process that are distinctive human in contrast those which can be most effectively achieved by an automated system. Another question worth considering is whether, and to what degree we must modify existing models of teaching SRL with adaptive digital learning tools. This question requires considering the competencies a teacher needs to support SRL in students effectively. Finally, there are questions regarding how we can best support the interaction between teachers, their learners (also in groups) with adaptive tools. For instance, we need to explore circumstances when on-loading (parts of) the regulation of learning will lead to desired outcomes, in contrast to situations when (momentarily) off-loading regulation. This also alludes to the trade-off between adaptivity and desirable difficulties during learning. Further, trust in automation should not be neglected when investigating the effects of computer systems in classrooms

Thanks for the wonderful organization go to: Joachim Wirth, Marie Vanderbeke, Flora Mehrabi, Hannah Wember & Laura Schmidt, Lisa Dautz

You can find out more about the SeReLiDiS network here.

nach oben


[02.02.24]
OECD webinar on AI in education featuring Nikol Rummel

Professor Nikol Rummel was a featured panelist at the OECD webinar titled "Decoding the hype: can AI help create accessible and inclusive student learning?" which took place on February 6th, from 13:00 to 14:00 CET.

The webinar, which delved into AI's potential for creating inclusive learning environments, featured speakers including Nikol Rummel, Wayne Holmes from UCL, Emile Kroeger from the United Robotics Group, and Kevin Johnstun from the US Department of Education.

The discussion revolved around addressing the benefits, challenges, and future impacts of AI in education.

You can watch the webinar here.

nach oben